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Albert Hofmann (born January 11, 1906) is a Swiss scientist best known for synthesizing LSD. Hofmann authored more than 100 scientific articles and has written a number of books, including LSD: My Problem Child. On January 11, 2006, Hofmann became a centenarian, and was the focus of an international symposium on LSD.

Hofmann also became interested in the seeds of the Mexican morning glory species Rivea corymbosa, the seeds of which are called Ololiuhqui by the natives. He was surprised to find the active compound of Ololiuhqui, ergine (lysergic acid amide), to be closely related to LSD.

In 1962, he and his wife Anita traveled to southern Mexico to search for the plant "Ska Maria Pastora" (Leaves of Mary the Shepherdess), later known as Salvia divinorum. He was able to obtain samples of this plant but never succeeded in identifying its active chemicals.

Hofmann has called LSD "medicine for the soul" and is frustrated by the worldwide prohibition that has pushed it underground. "It was used very successfully for 10 years in psychoanalysis," he said, adding that the drug was hijacked by the Counterculture of the 1960s and then unfairly demonized by the establishment that the movement opposed. He concedes LSD can be dangerous in the wrong hands.

External linksEdit

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page incorporates content from Wikipedia. The original article was at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Hofmann but you are free to edit it. The text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.



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